Words…


Finally I’m posting the new words I found in my translation. As you can see many of them may be common for you but I never heard of them.

What I need to know is if this words are still used and if they are correctly used.

Here are the words:

Grudging – as in: “Grudging I got out of bed.”

React– as respond, we use this word a lot but I don’t know if it is used in English. Like in “Making my mind react”

Faculty – We say that faculty is an area of a college specialized in something or were you learn something. Like the faculty of psychology or the economics faculty. Is faculty a word used in English?

Outskirts – as in: “The outskirts of the city” I’m using it as suburb.

Drifted – as in: “I drifted back to my memories of the other night.”

Keen – can you use this as an adjective for eyes?

Issuer – this is the meaning in the dictionary: person or thing that sends out.

Companion – “Compañero” in Spanish, it is used a lot in my language but I don’t know if you use it this way. I used it like this: “Tranquility was my companion on my way back”

Heinous– can I use this for fear? I am saying that I have heinous fear .As an atrocious fear.

Twist to understand – well as you can see this is not a word but I don’t know if in English someone can twist to understand something. In Spanish would be used as “ retorcerse” but I don’t know if it is correctly used like that.

Disrupting – as disturb. “He was disrupting me”.

Stubble – the meaning in the dictionary is: short rough growth of beard. Is it still used?

Stirred – can someone stir his hair?

Inspected – “Those eyes I couldn’t forget inspected me with such intensity that I felt as if they were touching me, making my skin burn.” Is correctly used there?

Cutting tone – can someone’s tone be cutting in English? Is like someone answering shortly and hard.

Interrogation– the dictionary says: act of questioning, investigation, inquiry, examination through questions. Is it still used like that?

Toured – As in: “I toured the legs with my eyes”

Lank – I’m using this for straight hair.

Ruffled – Can someone ruffle his hair?

“See you brother” – to use the term brother would be correct in Spanish between friends. Is it correct to use it in English or I should use another term?

Maybe some of this will not get to the final draft because I have to finally learn to SHOW and don’t tell but I will really appreciate your help.

Now I will go to continue struggling with the show and tell…

Have a wonderful day!

 

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25 comments on “Words…

  1. Instead of grudging you could say “grudgingly or begrudgingly, he got out of bed.”‘
    React is correct. Faculty is correct. Outskirts and drifted are correct. Keen can be used as an adjective for eyes. I don’t think issuer is used that often. The way you used companion makes sense to me. I wouldn’t use heinous for fear. Most people use it for crime, like, “That was a heinous crime.” I wouldn’t use twist to understand. I would probably just say “struggled to understand.” Disrupting and stubble are correct.
    I’m not sure what you mean by “Can someone stir his hear?” That doesn’t make sense. Unless you mean hair?
    I think inspected works fine in that sentence.
    You can say cutting tone. Interrogation is correct.
    I would never say “toured the legs.” It doesn’t really make sense.
    I would say lanky hair instead of lank hair.
    You can say ruffled his hair.
    Some people do call each other brother. I don’t hear it that often though.
    Hope that helps!

  2. Grudging – as in: “Grudging I got out of bed.”
    Grudgingly, I got out of bed. But it would be better to use something like, “I dragged myself out of bed.” Whenever you can use a stronger verb instead of an adverb, do so.
    React- as respond, we use this word a lot but I don’t know if it is used in English. Like in “Making my mind react”
    This works.
    Faculty – We say that faculty is an area of a college specialized in something or were you learn something. Like the faculty of psychology or the economics faculty. Is faculty a word used in English?
    Yes
    Outskirts – as in: “The outskirts of the city” I’m using it as suburb.
    This works.
    Drifted – as in: “I drifted back to my memories of the other night.”
    This works.
    Keen – can you use this as an adjective for eyes?
    Yes–if you mean “vision” and not the actual eye itself.
    Issuer – this is the meaning in the dictionary: person or thing that sends out.
    This works. Though it’s not a word I hear/read often.
    Companion – “Compañero” in Spanish, it is used a lot in my language but I don’t know if you use it this way. I used it like this: “Tranquility was my companion on my way back”
    This works.
    Heinous- can I use this for fear? I am saying that I have heinous fear .As an atrocious fear.
    This is slightly off. Heinous usually refers to an act of some kind, not a feeling. You might want to use: terrible, horrible, immense, intense, etc.
    Twist to understand – well as you can see this is not a word but I don’t know if in English someone can twist to understand something. In Spanish would be used as “ retorcerse” but I don’t know if it is correctly used like that.
    Do you mean to twist someone’s words to it’s purposely misunderstood? Yes, this works.
    Disrupting – as disturb. “He was disrupting me”.
    This works.
    Stubble – the meaning in the dictionary is: short rough growth of beard. Is it still used?
    Yup!
    Stirred – can someone stir his hear?
    Stir his heart? Yes.
    Inspected – “Those eyes I couldn’t forget inspected me with such intensity that I felt as if they were touching me, making my skin burn.” Is correctly used there?
    Inspected works, but it is very clinical. It can work, even in this sentence if you’re trying to get off that intense as his gaze was, he was still very methodical and cool about it. If you want to evoke passion, you might want to use: devour or some other word that evokes being gobbled up!
    Cutting tone – can someone’s tone be cutting in English? Is like someone answering shortly and hard.
    Yes!
    Interrogation- the dictionary says: act of questioning, investigation, inquiry, examination through questions. Is it still used like that?
    Yes!
    Toured – As in: “I toured the legs with my eyes”
    I’m not quite sure what this is supposed to mean, so I’m going to hazard a guess and say no, this doesn’t mean what you think it does. To tour is sightseeing, for the most part.
    Lank – I’m using this for straight hair.
    Lank is greasy, lifeless, straight, maybe tangled, totally lackluster hair. It can also mean skinny. Delgado.
    Ruffled – Can someone ruffle his hair?
    Yes!
    “See you brother” – to use the term brother would be correct in Spanish between friends. Is it correct to use it in English or I should use another term?
    Yes, this is used, but it’s usually reserved for friends who are LIKE brothers. Americans use it, the British typically don’t.

  3. In that context, it’s an adverb: grudgingly.
    Faculty usually means the teachers, not the subject itself.
    Maybe struggle to understand? (rather than ‘twist’)
    I suppose a person can disrupt another person — usually an action is disrupted, however (ie, her housecleaning was disrupted when the toilet exploded, ha).
    The wind can stir someone’s hair (ie, her hair stirred as the wind blew).
    I’ve never heard ‘toured’ used like that. Maybe ‘I scoured her legs with my eyes’…?
    DH and his friends will call each other ‘bro’, which is short for brother.
    All the others were usages I’ve heard 🙂

  4. Grudging — You could use it in this context, but you have to turn it into an advery by adding -ly to the end, as in: Grudgingly, he got out of bed.
    react — Your mind *could* react, but it would more likely be just you reacting, it can be with a physical gesture, as I reacted to his announcement by breaking out in a cold sweat. Although that may be just a tad too “telling”, more commonly in writing, you would not say you reacted so much as just describing the reaction itself, as in “i broke out in a cold sweat [at his words or when he was done].
    faculty – is more commonly referred to the group of teachers as a whole, not the faculty of psychology. Although there is another meaning for faculty that is more in line with how you’re using it, but again, not referring so much to an area of college, but I think you could say, “the faculty of speech or thought”? But that’s a pretty uncommon usage.
    Outskirts — close, but not quite suburbs, which I see as possibly being still alot of houses and residences. Outskirts would be more where the city is beginning to fade into countryside, but there are still a few isolated businesses or houses before the countryside itself begins.
    Drifted, Keen, issuer, companion, all correct.
    Heinous is usually used in connection to describing a crime, although technically it could be used as you list.
    Twist to understand — not really, no. Twist the truth has been used, but mostly twist is used as a physical verb, as in twisting a piece of cloth or string.
    disrupting is close, but more that someone usually will disrupt your train of thought or your actions.
    stubble is used, often, as you describe.
    Haven’t ever seen anyone “stir” their hair. But twist it around a finger, yes!
    Inspected it used correctly, as is cutting tone and interrogation (usually conducted by a police officer).
    toured — Um, no. tour is usually used as a noun, as in someone takes a tour of a city (led by a tour leader, who shows one the various landmarks in a city), or as a verb as in “I toured the city” (travelling around looking at the various landmarks, or whatever.)
    Lank, yes hair is straight when lank, but also limp and lifeless is more correct, the straightness usually comes along with the limp and lifeless.
    Ruffled is correct, it means to swish one’s hand through the other’s hair, or rub it back and forth.
    See you brother. Depends on who he’s talking to. Friends don’t always call each other brother, but it is possible. A more contemporary term is “bro”, short for brother, but again, its a terminology that can be very … hm, how do I say this? I think it’s used more often in the “gangster” type of talk, or younger people. It’s getting a little out of favor. The most common term used nowadays in the U.S. is “dude”.

    • Thank you very much for your detailed help!
      I take note of dude as a way of talking between friends.
      I will change faculty for psychology college or something like that.
      And say that the hair was straight.
      I will also change the words that with your explanation I know I got wrong.
      Again thank you very much!:)

  5. Grudging – should be “grudgingly” in this example, but is better shown than told, as others have noted.
    React- usually we would say “I reacted” rather than “my mind reacted.”
    Faculty – yes. Examples: “The teachers had to go to a faculty meeting.” “Trudy is on the faculty at Smith College.”
    Outskirts – yes.
    Drifted – yes.
    Keen – yes, but best to show rather than tell us that the person has keen eyesight.
    Issuer – correct, but rather formal and not very commonly used.
    Companion – “Tranquility was my companion” makes sense and is correct English, but it sounds very poetic and fancy; it’s not casual usage. So it would depend on the context.
    Heinous- It is an adjective, but I wouldn’t use it with “fear.” “Heinous crime” is the usual context.
    Twist to understand – I agree with Robin that “struggle” would be better. Or, if you wanted to be very creative, “I turned my mind inside out trying to understand …”
    Disrupting – yes, but this is rather formal. A teacher would say, “You are disrupting the class,” but a student would usually not use that word. A student would be more likely to say, “He’s bothering me.”
    Stubble – yes
    Stirred – I have nothing to add to the discussion you had with bogwitch on this one!
    Inspected – “Those eyes I couldn’t forget inspected me with such intensity that I felt as if they were touching me, making my skin burn.” Is correctly used there?
    Again, I agree with bogwitch on this one.
    Cutting tone – yes
    Interrogation- yes. A very thorough questioning, as by the police or someone in authority.
    Toured – no, we wouldn’t use “toured” with “eyes” that way
    Lank – I agree with what others have said.
    Ruffled – yes
    🙂

  6. I agree with most of the responses… But one usage that I’m surprised hasn’t been mentioned is faculty. When we use the word “faculty” in the US (and someone already mentioned this part), we’re referring to the professors. The “psychology department” or “department of economics” would refer to everything — professors (“faculty”), students, program requirements, etc. So I think when you say “faculty”, you really mean “department”.

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